Wordwatch Towers

A plain language guide to punctuation, grammar and writing well.

Take affect or take effect?

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Even the most beautifully produced and carefully edited books get it wrong sometimes. Look at this example from The Bedside Baccalaureate (a collection of lectures about various topics):

For his edict to take affect, however, it had to be written into the registry of laws…

That should be ‘take effect’. In other words, for his edict to ‘bring about a result’ or ‘get something done’.

Another example would be: ‘The medicine began to take effect.’  (not ‘take affect’)

Find out more about the difference between ‘affect’ and ‘effect’

More commonly confused words

Are you looking for an easy-to-understand guide to punctuation, grammar and writing well?

Wordwatch for KindleDid you enjoy this post and find it useful? If so, you might like Wordwatch: A Plain Language Guide to Grammar, Punctuation and Writing Well. It includes:

– easy-to-understand explanations of many aspects of grammar and punctuation that commonly cause   confusion;
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– definitions of commonly used foreign words and phrases;
– clear explanations of word classes, including nouns, adjectives and verbs; and
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Written by Wordwatch

01/01/2010 at 1:13 pm

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